Category Archives: Mr. Adair’s Classroom

“Where do we begin Mr. Adair?”

“At the beginning, ” he said. And throughout the year that I was under his tutelage – he would continue to challenge me to, “Never stop searching for truth.” In this endeavor, we provide – once again – the writings of many writers – many of whom I have known for years – providing historical lessons of import and understanding – little of which is addressed in our “classrooms” today.

For more on Mr. Adair and his importance – please visit our Welcome ~ Mission & Dedication page.

In Memoriam: the Death of ‘Stonewall‘ Jackson

“Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees.”

 ~ Lieutenant General Thomas J. ‘Stonewall‘  Jackson

 

The South lost one of its boldest and most colorful generals on this day in 1863, when 39-year-old Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson died of pneumonia a week after his own troops accidentally fired on him during the Battle of Chancellorsville in Virginia. In the first two years of the war, Jackson terrorized Union commanders and led his army corps on bold and daring marches. He was the perfect complement to Robert E. Lee. Continue reading

So Who IS Buried In John Wilkes Booth’s Grave?

I watched an interesting segment on the Infowars.com site on April 29th dealing with some history I had written about somewhere in the distant past. It was narrated by David Knight. I have always enjoyed watching David Knight’s commentary. He is a Christian man who is not ashamed of his faith and he lets you know that in a quiet, humble way.

His commentary on April 29th dealt, in part, with the fact that it does seem that we have been lied to for the past 150 years about whether Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth was really killed at Garrett’s Farm in Virginia and buried in the grave that, supposedly, contains his remains. (Continue to Metropolis Café)

Benson: Sheridan the War Criminal

Clifford Dowdey, in his book The History of the Confederacy 1832-1865, he had some commentary about the subject of this article, Philip H. Sheridan and it was not particularly complementary. Mr. Dowdey noted of Sheridan that he “…was an undersized man (five feet three) with an oversized head, in all ways…But Grant perceived in the man a quality he wanted in his all-out, no-holds-barred war of total conquest. The Sheridans, Milroys, and Hunters had a different kind of arrogance from the neo-princelings of the Cotton South. They had the arrogance of unrestrained might. Without regard for rights–of belligerants or fellow citizens or even of the so-called ‘human rights,’ let alone of the Union–these bully boys had a lust for physical violence and wanton destruction.” Continue reading

Jack Hinson: A Civil War Sniper Hell Bent on Revenge

John W. “Jack” Hinson, better known as “Old Jack” to his family, was a prosperous farmer in Stewart County, Tennessee. A non-political man, he opposed secession from the Union even though he owned slaves. Friends and neighbors described him as a peaceable man, yet despite all this, he would end up going on a one-man killing spree.  Continue reading

An Image of the South

“It is out of fashion these days to look backward rather than forward,” the poet John Crowe Ransom wrote almost thirty years ago. “About the only American given to it is some unreconstructed Southerner, who persists in his regard for a certain terrain, a certain history, and a certain inherited way of living.”

South Carolina College, 1820

Ransom made the remark in an essay composed for a book about the South called I’ll Take My Stand. The backward-looking Southerner, he said, “feels himself in the American scene as an anachronism, and knows he is felt by his neighbors as a reproach.” Continue reading

Yeah Brutha.. Tellz me ’bout dem repusrashuns!

Well, THAT got your attention, but you see – what we present here, is not some racist BS (although the title above may indicate otherwise). Nope… going through some archives a few minutes ago, I came across one of our posts from September of 2019 that certainly merits bringing back to the front – given that these past few weeks has got EVERYBODY (well… that is an exaggeration) – just polly-ticians – hawking the old ‘Reparations’ garbage.

Remember the words of Annie Lennox, “Everybody wants something for nuthin’…” So let’s see what Lance Spivey has to say about it. ~ Ed

Spivey: Slavery in the World

Reparations for Clowns?

I’ve been seeing a lot of internet posts and hearing a lot of talk about white people paying black people reparations for slavery, and how the “Rebel” flag is racist. First of all, I’ve never owned a slave, nor has any living relative of mine, nor has anyone I know or any member of their families. Second of all, you’ve never picked one single tuft of cotton, nor, probably, has any member of your family or anybody you know. So take those “reparations” and shove ‘em. Third, that flag stands for freedom, not racism nor slavery, and to treat it as such is to defame the characters of all the men who fought for Her, black and white alike. (Continue to The Metropolis Café)

The Battle of Hattin for the Kingdom of Heaven

When July 4 Meant Defeat by Islam

Soon after liberating the ancient Christian city of Antioch from Muslim oppression, the First Crusaders managed to realize their primary goal: take Jerusalem from Islam in 1099.

Despite all the propaganda that surrounds the conquest of Jerusalem, there were very few Muslim calls to jihad (only one is known, and it quickly fell on deaf ears). After all, in the preceding decades, and thanks to Sunni and Shia infighting, local Muslim populations were hardly unused to such invasions and bloodbaths.

In Muslim historian Ibn al-Athir’s words:

While the Franks – Allah damn them! – were conquering and settling in a part of the territories of Islam, the rulers and armies of Islam were fighting among themselves, causing discord and disunity among their people and weakening their power to combat the enemy.

In this context, the pure doctrine of jihad – warfare against infidels – was lost to the average Muslim, who watched and suffered as Muslim empires and sects collided. Continue reading

The real reason Thomas Jefferson owned a copy of the Qur’an…

A 232 Year History of our fight against Islam & why it is no longer taught in our public schools…

When Thomas Jefferson saw there was no negotiating with Muslims, he formed what is now the Marines (sea going soldiers). These Marines were attached to U. S. Merchant vessels. When the Muslims attacked U.S. merchant vessels they were repulsed by armed soldiers, but there is more.

The Marines followed the Muslims back to their villages and killed every man, woman, and child in the village.

It didn’t take long for the Muslims to leave U.S. Merchant vessels alone.

English and French merchant vessels started running up our flag when entering the Mediterranean to secure safe travel. Continue reading

How the South Won the Civil War

During Reconstruction, true citizenship finally seemed in reach for black Americans. Then their dreams were dismantled.

Black political power during Reconstruction was short-lived—eclipsed, in significant part, by a campaign of terror. Illustration by Cristiana Couceiro. Photographs: Hirarchivum Press / Alamy (Ku Klux Klan); Smith Collection / Gado / Getty (building); Universal History Archive / Getty (flags); Everett / Alamy (gallows)

Not so long ago, the Civil War was taken to be this country’s central moral drama. Now we think that the aftermath—the confrontation not of blue and gray but of white and black, and the reimposition of apartheid through terror—is what has left the deepest mark on American history. Instead of arguing about whether the war could have turned out any other way, we argue about whether the postwar could have turned out any other way. Was there ever a fighting chance for full black citizenship, equality before the law, agrarian reform? Or did the combination of hostility and indifference among white Americans make the disaster inevitable? Continue reading

Abigail Adams (March 31, 1776)

“…remember the ladies!”

In a letter dated March 31, 1776, Abigail Adams writes to her husband, John Adams, urging him and the other members of the Continental Congress not to forget about the nation’s women when fighting for America’s independence from Great Britain.

The future First Lady wrote in part, “I long to hear that you have declared an independency. And, by the way, in the new code of laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the husbands. Remember, all men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” Continue reading

The President and The Press: Address before the American Newspaper Publishers Association

President John F. Kennedy
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York City
April 27, 1961

Mr. Chairman, ladies and gentlemen:

I appreciate very much your generous invitation to be here tonight.

You bear heavy responsibilities these days and an article I read some time ago reminded me of how particularly heavily the burdens of present day events bear upon your profession.

You may remember that in 1851 the New York Herald Tribune under the sponsorship and publishing of Horace Greeley, employed as its London correspondent an obscure journalist by the name of Karl Marx. Continue reading

The Real American Revolution ~ 1776 or 1861?

Thaddeus Stevens

Many have, over the years, no doubt to their government school “educations” looked at the 14th Amendment, and been under the misguided delusion that it was a milestone in the cause of “racial equality.”

It might not hurt for those prone to such flights of fancy to take a look at the prime mover behind that amendment, the radical Thaddeus Stevens from Pennsylvania (and no credit to that state). I have recently done articles dealing with him so this will only add info to what’s already out there. Stevens has been characterized by some who’ve written about him as an “apostle of hate.” I guess you’d have to say that’s an apt description of him. His vindictive attitude toward the South before, during, and after the War of Northern Aggression might well be described as pathological. Continue reading

Lesson Learned ~ Rescuing Old Joe

Whoever weds himself to the spirit of this age will find himself a widower in the next. ~ William Inge

Few realize that Florida was so committed to The War Between the States that she gave more soldiers to repel Northern invaders than she had registered voters. Gainesville was among the towns that responded. As a result, the local United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) chapter erected a statue of an ordinary infantryman in honor of the hometown boys who had fallen, including many buried anonymously far from home. When erected in 1904 most of the living veterans were in their sixties and seventies

In May 2017 the county commissioners voted to remove the monument, which had become known to most residents during the previous 113 years as Old Joe.

After the vote one audience member raised her hand to ask a question. The Chair recognized Nansea Markham who is President of the local UDC chapter. She asked, “What will you do with the memorial?Continue reading

Victor Hugo on John Brown

A rare first edition of a pamphlet written by Hugo and retaining its original photograph of Hugo’s striking line drawing of the 1859 hanging of Brown.

French author Victor Hugo was, it seems, a militant supporter of American abolitionist John Brown.

Prior to Brown’s execution, Hugo sent a letter to the London Evening News decrying the decision to hang Brown. He wrote:

”…When we reflect on what Brown, the liberator, the champion of Christ, has striven to effect, and when we remember that he is about to die, slaughtered by the American Republic, that crime assumes an importance co-extensive with that of the nation which commits it — and when we say to ourselves that this nation is one of the glories of the human race; that, like France, like England, like Germany, she is one of the great agents of civilization; that she sometimes even leaves Europe in the rear by the sublime audacity of some of her progressive movements; that she is the Queen of an entire world, and that her brow is irradiated with a glorious halo of freedom, we declare our conviction that John Brown will not die; for we recoil horror-struck from the idea of so great a crime committed by so great a people…

For – yes, let America know it, and ponder on it well – there is something more terrible than Cain slaying Abel: It is Washington slaying Spartacus!”
Continue reading

Senator John F. Kennedy on the Electoral College

Calls to abolish the electoral college are all the rage these days, but they aren’t new. One such attempt in 1956 was thwarted with the help of a Democratic senator from Massachusetts — a young John F. Kennedy.

The Senate was debating Senate Joint Resolution 31 on March 20, 1956, a “follow-up to what was originally labeled the Lodge-Gossett proposal,” author and law professor Robert Hardaway told The Daily Caller. Continue reading

The True Heirs of the Founding Fathers’ Vision

In the post-War between the States mythology supported by the victors, the Antebellum South was Satanic and subject to “slave power,” the alleged immense power of the plantation owners and their demonic desire to perpetuate slavery at all costs. This mythology goes further and claims that the War between the States was caused by slavery, with the North desiring to end slavery and the South desiring to increase its range by moving it into the territories. The North, it is alleged, accepted the Founding Fathers’s real vision for America while the South, with its outdated notion of “States’s Rights,” was poisoned by treason against the ideals of the American Founders.

It is now trite to say that “The victors write the history books,” but the saying rings true in the case of the War between the States. Such myths are difficult to dispel since they are thoroughly engrained in the general culture. Every culture has myths, but when the divide between myth and historical reality is too great, those myths should be rejected, especially if they practically lead to harm. Walter Kirk Wood’s book, Beyond Slavery, offers a major corrective to the “standard history” of the South by defending Southern views as representative of the Founding Fathers, while Northern views, especially as found in Lincoln as well as in New England, are alien to the founders’ fundamental principles. Continue reading

Williams: Why We Are a Republic, NOT a Democracy

Hillary Clinton blamed the Electoral College for her stunning defeat in the 2016 presidential election in her latest memoirs, “What Happened.”

Some have claimed that the Electoral College is one of the most dangerous institutions in American politics.

Why? They say the Electoral College system, as opposed to a simple majority vote, distorts the one-person, one-vote principle of democracy because electoral votes are not distributed according to population. Continue reading

Ronald Reagan ~ Abortion and the Conscience of the Nation (January 22, 1983)

The following was published as an essay by Ronald Reagan, while sitting as the fortieth president of the United States, on the tenth anniversary of Roe vs. Wade. It is more timely today nearly 40 years later.

January 22, 1983 ~ The 10th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Roe vs. Wade is a good time for us to pause and reflect. Our nationwide policy of abortion-on-demand through all nine months of pregnancy was neither voted for by our people nor enacted by our legislators – not a single state had such unrestricted abortion before the Supreme Court decreed it to be national policy in 1973. But the consequences of this judicial decision are now obvious: since 1973, more than 15 million unborn children have had their lives snuffed out by legalized abortions. That is over ten times the number of Americans lost in all our nation’s wars. Continue reading

Texas Declares Independence from Mexico ~ March 2, 1836

On March 2, 1836, Texas formally declared its independence from Mexico. The Texas Declaration of Independence was signed at Washington-on-the-Brazos, now commonly referred to as the “birthplace of Texas.” Similar to the United States Declaration of Independence, this document focused on the rights of citizens to “life” and “liberty” but with an emphasis on the “property of the citizen.”

The Texas Declaration of Independence was issued during a revolution against the Mexican government that began in October 1835 following a series of government edicts including dissolution of state legislatures, disarmament of state militias, and abolition of the Constitution of 1824. Continue reading

The Other Founders: The Legacy of Anti-Federalism

To a very great extent, it was the Anti-Federalists, through their rhetoric and writings, who kept alive the spirit of localism and salvaged the great ideal of limited government inherited from the Revolution…

A review of The Other Founders: Anti-Federalism and the Dissenting Tradition in America, 1788-1828 by Saul Cornell (University of North Carolina Press, 1999).

The Anti-Federalists who opposed ratification of the Constitution have not fared well among American historians and political, scientists. Nothing reveals more starkly the near-complete disinterest in Anti-Federalist thought than a bibliographical check of books and essays on the Constitution and the American political tradition published since the late nineteenth century. With the exception of Jonathan Elliot’s Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Constitution (1836), which contains an assortment of letters and speeches by some of the Anti-Federalists in nine of the State ratifying conventions, and Paul Leicester Ford’s limited selection of Anti-Federalist tracts in his Pamphlets on the Constitution (1888) and Essays on the Constitution (1892), only a handful of Anti-Federalist writings have been available to the modem reader; and scholarly studies of the Anti-Federalist critique of the Constitution have been virtually non-existent. Continue reading

Booker T. Washington’s Racial Compromise?

Booker T. Washington indeed might have sought reconciliation between white and black, but his call was truly to his own race alone to educate themselves and to work hard to improve mind and character. Does that make Washington a lesser advocate for racial equality, a less successful one?

I first read Up from Slavery ten years ago and was quickly surprised that it wasn’t required reading for every educator, that is, until I read the critics. In his autobiography, Booker Taliaferro Washington (1856-1915) leaves us an equal bounty of moral wisdom and caution that all began with his dream to learn. Education and merit are central to his story. He writes, “There was never a time in my youth, no matter how dark and discouraging the days might be, when one resolve did not continually remain with me, and that was a determination to secure an education at any cost.” Continue reading

Thomas Paine ~ Our Hell-Raising Founding Father

Thomas Paine

… if the journalistic credos of speaking truth to power, comforting the afflicted, and afflicting the comfortable have a godhead, that would have to be Paine, whose writing was so provocative and so uncompromising that he faced the gibbet and the blade everywhere he published—in England, and in France, and in the United Colonies.” ~ Craig Nelson

Thomas Pain (later changed to Paine) was born on January 29, 1737 in Thetford, England, his 40-year-old Anglican mother the daughter of a popular local lawyer, his 29-year-old Quaker father a destitute master craftsman staymaker. In Thetford the Pains lived within sight of the local hanging ground called Gallows Hill. Paine biographer Craig Nelson tells us… Continue reading

In Honor of Thomas Jackson

“Stonewall” Jackson

If I were to ask you to name the greatest general who ever served America, who would you name? Would it be Patton, MacArthur, Washington, or maybe perhaps Colin Powell or Norman Schwarzkopf? I would have to answer that the greatest general to ever serve his country would be Thomas Jackson. Never heard of him? Here, maybe if I told you his nickname it might help; Stonewall Jackson.

Thomas Jackson was an instructor at V.M.I., (Virginia Military Institute), when the call came from Abraham Lincoln to supply 3 regiments to support the oppression of the insurrection in the Cotton States. Unlike the tyrant Lincoln, Jackson understood the relationship between the States and the federal authority, and his loyalty was, first and foremost, to his native state of Virginia. When asked whether he would support the secession of Virginia, Jackson stated, “If Virginia adheres to the United States, I adhere. Her determination must control mine. This is my understanding of patriotism. And though I love the Union, I love Virginia more.” Continue reading

A $20 Gold Coin that Saved a Life

A story that a sweetheart gave a Confederate soldier George Dixon a $20 gold coin dated 1860 as a good luck charm has been validated. The story was that George kept the coin with him always, in his pocket, as good luck. During the Battle of Shiloh, George was shot point blank. The bullet struck in his pocket hitting the center of the gold coin. The impact was said to have left the gold piece bent, with the bullet embedded in it which saved his life. Continue reading